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Below is the stream related to your search. In the left-hand column are the references in the Research Portal that are in your search item. In the right-hand column are the citations that have referenced your search item. You can continue following this stream by clicking the “View stream” button on one of the Reference or Citation entries.

References (20 in Portal)
Back in Time
 
Executive coaching: The need for standards of competence.

L Brotman, W Liberi, K Wasylyshyn Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 1998

Psychologists working in the emerging competency area of "executive coaching" must promote a more complete understanding of what constitutes effectiveness in this arena—particularly when the expected outcome is sustained behavior change. Experienced psychologists must accept accountability for the need to inform and educate corporate deci...

Cites in Google Scholar: 320
 
Coaching versus therapy: A perspective.

J Blattner, V Hart, S Leipsic Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2001

This article reports a study of current perceptions among professionals regarding therapy and coaching. Whereas therapy and counseling have been traditional fields of study and practice, coaching is not as well developed. It is helpful to examine the perceptions of practicing professionals in order to delineate the distinctions and overla...

Cites in Google Scholar: 264
 
Executive coaching.

H Levinson Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 1996

Executive coaching requires the ability on the part of the coach to differentiate coaching from psychotherapy while using basic psychological skills and insights. It is usually short term and issue focused. At high executive levels, its success depends heavily on the consultant's knowledge about contemporary management and political issue...

Cites in Google Scholar: 769
 
Executive coaching: An outcome study.

K Wasylyshyn Consulting Psychology Journal 2003

While executive coaching continues to mushroom as a practice area, there has been little outcome research. This article presents the results of a study that explored factors influencing the choice of a coach, executives' reactions to working with a coach, the pros and cons of both internal and external coaches, the focus of executive coac...

Cites in Google Scholar: 586
 
From couch to corporation: Becoming a successful corporate therapist.

I Martin John Wiley & Sons 1996

Increasingly, corporations are finding that conventional change management consultants are incapable of dealing constructively with the larger psychological issues that underpin successful change and ultimately impact the bottom line. As a consequence, more and more business executives are coming to rely upon the services of consultant ps...

Cites in Google Scholar: 15
 
Executive coaching at work: The art of one-on-one change.

DB Peterson Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 1996

Outlines the 5 research-based strategies that guide one-on-one coaching by a management consulting firm: forge a partnership, inspire commitment, grow skills, promote persistence, and shape the environment. The case study of a typical targeted coaching participant (a female executive who sought to develop stronger relationships with inter...

Cites in Google Scholar: 267
 
Working with executives: Consulting, counseling, and coaching.

L Sperry Individual Psychology: Journal of Adlerian Theory, Research ... 1993

Describes the inner world and needs of today's executives and how psychologists and psychiatrists can respond to their need for consulting, coaching, and counseling. Profiles of the healthy, distressed, and impaired executive are sketched, and 3 types of services are described: executive consulting, executive counseling, and executive coa...

Cites in Google Scholar: 112
 
Coaching executives.

LL Tobias Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 1996

Describes a systems-based approach to executive coaching that attempts to maximize the consideration of contextual factors. The case study of a 44-yr-old male executive illustrates this approach. The author notes that perhaps the greatest danger in coaching individuals from organizations in which there is no ongoing consulting relationshi...

Cites in Google Scholar: 242
 
Multimodal therapy: A useful model for the executive coach.

JT Richard Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 1999

The author suggests the use of Arnold A. Lazarus's multimodal therapy model as an integrative and holistic approach to executive coaching. So as not to overlook any significant factors, the coach evaluates the executive on seven dimensions. The eclectic-oriented practitioner is encouraged to use a variety of interventions and tests that u...

Cites in Google Scholar: 89
 
The Alchemy of Coaching:" You're Good, Jennifer, But You Could Be Really Good".

DB Peterson, J Millier Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2005

In the literature of the coaching profession, the voice of the client is rarely heard. This case study examines the coaching process from the perspective of both the coach and the participant, providing unique insights into the art of coaching. Beginning with background descriptions of the coach and the participant, the authors move into ...

Cites in Google Scholar: 42
 
Executive coaching

G Blackman-Sheppard Industrial and Commercial Training 2004

Executive coaching is often seen as higher grade coaching that is the sole prerogative of the high‐flying executive, accompanied on hallowed ground by the mystical executive coach. However, the foundation stones for executive coaching – quality integrated thinking, confidentiality, trust – are equally important to all its people if an org...

Cites in Google Scholar: 421
Citations (8 in Portal)
Forward in Time
 
Executive coaching outcome research: The contribution of common factors such as relationship, personality match, and self efficacy.

de Haan. E., A Duckworth, D Birch, C Jones Consulting Psychology Journal 2013

This article argues for a new way of studying executive-coaching outcomes, which is illustrated with a study based on data from 156 client– coach pairs. The argument accepts that we are unlikely to get robust data on coaching outcomes in the near future but assumes that we can expect similar effectiveness for coaching as that demonstrated...

Cites in Google Scholar: 354
 
Signalling a new trend in executive coaching outcome research

E de Haan, A Duckworth International Coaching Psychology Review 2013

Purpose: This contribution argues for a new way of studying executive-coaching outcome. The argument accepts that we are not likely to get rigorous data on coaching outcome from well-designed clinical trials in the near future, and assumes a degree of effectiveness that is based upon the first indications and the more rigorous studies ...

Cites in Google Scholar: 44
 
Inspirational chaos: Executive coaching and tolerance of complexity

PJ Webb Australian Academic Press 2005

The historical events of 9/11, the subsequent wars, and the coincidental collapse of corporations and economies have heightened the perception of complexity and uncertainty in the business environment. Executive managers face unprecedented challenges, solutions for which are often beyond the reach of current practice. That we live in turb...

Cites in Google Scholar: 3
 
Model agility: Coaching effectiveness and four perspectives on a case study

C Kauffman, W Hodgetts Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2016

The effectiveness of coaching can be enhanced if coaches are familiar with multiple psychological models, can hold these in mind simultaneously, and are able to apply them as appropriate to their clients—a capacity we refer to as model agility. To illustrate this capacity we first explore some of its ramifications and parallels to the cha...

Cites in Google Scholar: 2
 
Model agility: Coaching effectiveness and four perspectives on a case study

C Kauffman, W Hodgetts Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2016

The effectiveness of coaching can be enhanced if coaches are familiar with multiple psychological models, can hold these in mind simultaneously, and are able to apply them as appropriate to their clients—a capacity we refer to as model agility. To illustrate this capacity we first explore some of its ramifications and parallels to the cha...

Cites in Google Scholar: 2
 
Executive coaching: The age factor

L Tamir, L Finfer Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2016

Lifespan psychology suggests that executives in their 30s, 40s, and 50s represent different maturational levels and professional experience. To date, research has not explored the relationship between the age of an executive and the coaching process or coaching outcomes. We hypothesized that executives in these age ranges would respond di...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
 
Coaching through walking

A Turner The Coaching Psychologist 2017

This article is the second in an occasional series of papers that attempt to articulate different approaches to coaching practice and should be read in conjunction with the first article about working with finger puppets (Turner, 2016). Both articles illustrate a set of different approaches to further coaching practice that seeks to suppo...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
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