Results - Stream

Below is the stream related to your search. In the left-hand column are the references in the Research Portal that are in your search item. In the right-hand column are the citations that have referenced your search item. You can continue following this stream by clicking the “View stream” button on one of the Reference or Citation entries.

References (25 in Portal)
Back in Time
 
Coaches’ experience of critical moments in the coaching.

A Day, E de Haan, C Sills, E Blass International Coaching Psychology Review 2008

This paper presents the findings of a qualitative research study into critical moments in the coaching relationship. Interviews were completed with a total of 28 experienced coaches. The research highlighted that critical moments are unforeseen and characterised by intense emotions and anxiety within the coaching relationship. These momen...

Cites in Google Scholar: 98
 
Critical moments of clients and coaches: A direct-comparison study.

A Day, de Haan. E., C Bertie, C Sills International Coaching Psychology Review 2010

Purpose: In this study descriptions of critical moments of coaching as experienced by both executive coaches and their clients are analysed and compared, to find out more about what works in coaching conversations. Design/Methodology: This is a real-time direct-comparison study of coaches’ and clients’ critical-moment experiences with...

Cites in Google Scholar: 61
 
Executive coaching in practice: What determines helpfulness for clients of coaching.

de Haan. E., V Culpin, J Curd Personnel Review 2011

Purpose – Executive coaching is gaining in popularity, both as part of personal or organisational development programmes and as a tailored form of individual consulting. The purpose of this study is to examine how various aspects of the executive coaching intervention make a difference to the clients of coaching themselves. Design/meth...

Cites in Google Scholar: 275
 
Executive coaching outcome research: The contribution of common factors such as relationship, personality match, and self efficacy.

de Haan. E., A Duckworth, D Birch, C Jones Consulting Psychology Journal 2013

This article argues for a new way of studying executive-coaching outcomes, which is illustrated with a study based on data from 156 client– coach pairs. The argument accepts that we are unlikely to get robust data on coaching outcomes in the near future but assumes that we can expect similar effectiveness for coaching as that demonstrated...

Cites in Google Scholar: 360
 
Coaching and consulting in multicultural contexts: Integrating themes and issues.

R Lowman Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2007

This article reviews a series of articles in a special section on "Coaching and Consulting in Multicultural Contexts." It identifies overlapping themes and issues (e.g., the role of perception, culture, pragmatic wisdom, and trust in coaching), as well as issues still to be addressed. It is argued that much work remains to be done to esta...

Cites in Google Scholar: 26
 
The state of executive coaching research: What does the current literature tell us and what’s next for coaching research.

J Passmore, C Gibbes International Coaching Psychology Review 2007

This paper asks the question; what do coaching psychologists bring to the developing market of executive coaching? While psychologists are trained in human behaviour, this paper argues that their real unique contribution may be their ability to undertake high quality research. The paper moves to summarise executive coaching research to da...

Cites in Google Scholar: 178
 
People are complex and the world is messy: A behavior-based approach to executive coaching.

D Peterson John Wiley & Sons 2006

I have a simple yet fundamental assumption about coaching: The purpose is to change behavior. The core of my coaching boils down to one equally simple yet provocative question for the participant: What are you going to do differently? Implicit in that question is a focus on action and a focus on the future (rather than the past). This cha...

Cites in Google Scholar: 108
 
An Integrated Model of Goal-Focused Coaching: An evidence-based framework for teaching and practice

A Grant International Coaching Psychology Review 2012

There is a considerable body of literature on goals and goal setting in the psychological literature, but little of this has found its way into the scholarly coaching literature. This article draws on the goal-setting literature from the behavioural sciences. It discusses a range of approaches to understanding the goal construct, prese...

Cites in Google Scholar: 236
 
Executive coaching enhances goal attainment, resilience and workplace well-being: A randomised controlled study

AM Grant, L Curtayne, G Burton The Journal of Positive Psychology 2009

In a randomised controlled study, 41 executives in a public health agency received 360-degree feedback, a half-day leadership workshop, and four individual coaching sessions over 10 weeks. The coaching used a cognitive-behavioural solution-focused approach. Quantitative and qualitative measures were taken. This is the first published rand...

Cites in Google Scholar: 533
 
Signalling a new trend in executive coaching outcome research

E de Haan, A Duckworth International Coaching Psychology Review 2013

Purpose: This contribution argues for a new way of studying executive-coaching outcome. The argument accepts that we are not likely to get rigorous data on coaching outcome from well-designed clinical trials in the near future, and assumes a degree of effectiveness that is based upon the first indications and the more rigorous studies ...

Cites in Google Scholar: 44
 
A personal perspective on professional coaching and the development of coaching psychology

AM Grant International Coaching Psychology Review 2006

Coaching psychology can be understood as being the systematic application of behavioural science to the enhancement of life experience, work performance and well-being for individuals, groups and organisations who do not have clinically significant mental heath issues or abnormal levels of distress. Although psychologists have long act...

Cites in Google Scholar: 121
84 KB
What do you Really Want: an Examination of the Pursuit of Goal Setting in Coaching

D Jinks, J Dexter International Journal of Evidence Based Coaching and Mentori... 2012

This article examines what appears to be a societal compulsion towards goal pursuit and target setting within a coaching context. It explores the dissonance between coaching principles and coaching practice and the negative consequences of such a target driven culture. Concerns are that practitioners adopt models and ways of working th...

Cites in Google Scholar: 11
 
Third generation coaching: Reconstructing dialogues through collaborative practice and a focus on values

R Stelter International Coaching Psychology Review 2014

Third generation coaching unfolds a new universe for coaching and coaching psychology in the framework of current social research, new learning theories and discourses about personal leadership. Third generation coaching views coaching in a societal perspective. Coaching has become important as a form of dialogue because the (hyper)com...

Cites in Google Scholar: 10
 
A model of executive coaching: A qualitative study

MT Augustijnen, G Schnitzer, R Van Esbroeck International Coaching Psychology Review 2011

Objective: This paper targets the development of an experimental based model of executive coaching using a qualitative analysis of interview data with coachees. Design: In this study data on the process of executive coaching were collected ex post facto with 10 persons who had gone through executive coaching during 2008–2009. Methods:...

Cites in Google Scholar: 18
 
Coaching on the Axis: An integrative and systemic approach to business coaching

M Kahn International Coaching Psychology Review 2011

Business coaching is defined as occurring within an organisational context with the goal of promoting success at all levels of the organisation by affecting the actions of those being coached. Its success is based in the quality of the coaching relationship and the degree to which it successfully aligns with the organisation from which...

Cites in Google Scholar: 19
 
A grounded theory study of the value derived by women in financial services through a coaching intervention to help them identify their strengths and practice using them in the workplace

F Elston, I Boniwell International Coaching Psychology Review 2011

Objectives: There are several definitions of strengths within psychology, united by a common theme: strengths are what people do best and most easily. Research shows that actively using strengths provides a range of benefits, and suggests that strengths-based coaching is a valuable approach. This study’s purpose was to investigate stre...

Cites in Google Scholar: 25
 
The meeting of the minds: Positive psychology and coaching psychology

C Kauffman, PA Linley International Coaching Psychology Review 2007

As part of this special issue of the International Coaching Psychology Review, Carol Kauffman and Alex Linley sought the views of some leading figures in positive psychology about how they saw a positive coaching psychology. Here is what they had to say.

Cites in Google Scholar: 6
 
Coaching, HRD, and Relational Richness Putting the Pieces Together

T Egan, RG Hamlin Advances in Developing Human Resources 2014

The Problem Coaching is becoming a ubiquitous form of human resource development (HRD) that experiences regular annual gains in both interest and participation. Yet it lacks theoretical framing and has not been conceptually well developed. There is a need for further framing of coaching as a dyadic, or group-based phenomenon, occurring in...

Cites in Google Scholar: 11
 
A large-scale study of executive and workplace coaching: The relative contributions of relationship, personality match, and self-efficacy.

E de Haan, A Grant, Y Burger, P Eriksson Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2016

This large-scale study of executive coaching explores the perceived effectiveness of coaching from the perspectives of coach, coachee, and sponsor, and potential active ingredients including the coach–coachee working alliance, coachee self-efficacy, personality, and “personality match” between coach and coachee. Using a retrospective desi...

Cites in Google Scholar: 3
 
Coaching: Meaning-making process or goal-resolution process?

N Cunningham Philosophy of Coaching: An International Journal 2017

Two schools of thought exist about the purpose and process of coaching. One school of thought holds the strong belief or assumption that the purpose of coaching is to change behaviour through a goal-directed approach. The counterview has the underlying assumption that coaching is a meaning-making process, a shared journey that may or may ...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
Citations (0 in Portal)
Forward in Time
Report a Problem