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Below is the stream related to your search. In the left-hand column are the references in the Research Portal that are in your search item. In the right-hand column are the citations that have referenced your search item. You can continue following this stream by clicking the “View stream” button on one of the Reference or Citation entries.

References (13 in Portal)
Back in Time
 
Key characteristics of the commercial Australian executive coach training industry.

A Grant, B O'Hara International Coaching Psychology Review 2008

Objectives: To identify organisations who offer executive coach training and business coach training in Australia; assessment processes, cost and duration of courses; the delineation between coaching and counselling; marketing claims made; and the qualifications of the owners and trainers. Design: A qualitative process of emergent them...

Cites in Google Scholar: 16
 
Behind closed doors: What really happens in executive coaching. Organizational Dynamics

D Hall, K Otazo, G Hollenbeck Organizational Dynamics 1999

Presents the results of a study sponsored by Boston University's Executive Development Roundtable that allow a critical review of the state of the practice of executive coaching. The study consisted of interviews with over 75 executives in Fortune 100 companies, as well as interviews with 15 executive coaches referred to the researchers a...

Cites in Google Scholar: 747
 
Hidden in plain sight: The active ingredients of executive coaching.

D McKenna, SL Davis Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Sc... 2009

We propose that I/O psychologists who coach executives have overlooked psychotherapy outcome research as a source of information and ideas that can be used to improve our executive coaching practices. This research, based on thousands of studies and many meta-analyses, has converged on the conclusion that four ‘‘active ingredients’’ accou...

Cites in Google Scholar: 225
 
The state of executive coaching research: What does the current literature tell us and what’s next for coaching research.

J Passmore, C Gibbes International Coaching Psychology Review 2007

This paper asks the question; what do coaching psychologists bring to the developing market of executive coaching? While psychologists are trained in human behaviour, this paper argues that their real unique contribution may be their ability to undertake high quality research. The paper moves to summarise executive coaching research to da...

Cites in Google Scholar: 178
 
The wisdom of coaching: Essential papers in consulting psychology for a world of change.

R Kilburg, RC Diedrich American Psychological Association 2007

This book is organized into four sections. My coeditor, Richard C. Diedrich, has written brief introductions and summaries for each that introduce the articles. The first section contains articles that focus on definitions, history, and research on executive coaching and the commentaries that accompanied each of the issues of the journal....

Cites in Google Scholar: 26
 
Media perceptions of executive coaching and the formal preparation of coaches.

AN Garman, DL Whiston, K Zlatoper Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2000

Seventy-two articles on executive coaching appearing in mainstream and trade management publications between 1991 and 1998 were analyzed to determine (a) general opinions of the practice of executive coaching and (b) the extent to which training in psychology was described as relevant and useful to coaching practice. A content analysis me...

Cites in Google Scholar: 119
 
Coaching high achievers.

G Jones, K Spooner Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2006

This investigation used semistructured interviews with coaches (n = 7) and high achievers (n = 14) from business and sports to identify common characteristics of high achievers that are important to take into account when coaching them, coaching needs of high achievers, and key implications for the practice of coaching high achievers. Con...

Cites in Google Scholar: 103
 
The three-way mirror of executive coaching

D Luebbe 2005

The purpose of the study was to investigate executive caching practices, coach behaviors, attributes, and skills that result in the most effective coaching outcomes as perceived by three groups-the coach, the coachee who is the recipient of coaching, and the human resource brokers of coaching services in an organization. In the qualitati...

Cites in Google Scholar: 37
 
Duty of care in an unregulated industry: Initial findings on the diversity and practices of Australian coaches

GB Spence, M Cavanagh, AM Grant International Coaching Psychology Review 2006

Little has been reported about the skills, experience and training of coaches in the Australian context, yet these are critical factors in the ethical practice of coaching. Previous research and experience suggests that formal coach training varies considerably in terms of curricula and quality. At the same time, data is emerging that ...

Cites in Google Scholar: 46
 
Executive coaching and consulting:" Different strokes for different folks".

WH Berman, G Bradt Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 2006

Increasing frustration with the politics and economics of traditional mental health care has led many psychologists to consider shifting to or adding executive coaching as a core competency in their practices. Experience with work-related issues in clinical practice makes this appear to be a logical extension of traditional clinical and c...

Cites in Google Scholar: 65
Citations (5 in Portal)
Forward in Time
 
A model of executive coaching: A qualitative study

MT Augustijnen, G Schnitzer, R Van Esbroeck International Coaching Psychology Review 2011

Objective: This paper targets the development of an experimental based model of executive coaching using a qualitative analysis of interview data with coachees. Design: In this study data on the process of executive coaching were collected ex post facto with 10 persons who had gone through executive coaching during 2008–2009. Methods:...

Cites in Google Scholar: 18
 
A critical review

J Passmore International Coaching Psychology Review 2010

Objectives: This study sought to identify the key behaviours used by executive coaches that were perceived by coachees to have the most favourable impact on their experience and progress. Design: The study used a semi-structured interview design within a qualitative approach. Methods: Grounded theory was employed to analyse the transcr...

Cites in Google Scholar: 279
 
What Is the Active Ingredients Equation for Success in Executive Coaching?

D McKenna, S Davis Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2009

In this response, we address commentator concerns about the generalizability of the active ingredients of psychotherapy to the science and practice of executive coaching. We discuss four ingredient that may make a difference: (a) client characteristics, (b) goals or success criteria, (c) role of the organization, and (d) contextual kno...

Cites in Google Scholar: 8
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A grounded theory study of how executive coaches help professionals deal with workplace intimidation

A Fields 2016

A grounded theory research design was used to explore how executive coaches help professionals deal with workplace intimidation. Workplace intimidation has a negative impact on targets of repeated hostile actions and language directed toward them by another employee at work. The phenomenon also has a negative effect on organizations in t...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
 
Coaching: Meaning-making process or goal-resolution process?

N Cunningham Philosophy of Coaching: An International Journal 2017

Two schools of thought exist about the purpose and process of coaching. One school of thought holds the strong belief or assumption that the purpose of coaching is to change behaviour through a goal-directed approach. The counterview has the underlying assumption that coaching is a meaning-making process, a shared journey that may or may ...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
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