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Below is the stream related to your search. In the left-hand column are the references in the Research Portal that are in your search item. In the right-hand column are the citations that have referenced your search item. You can continue following this stream by clicking the “View stream” button on one of the Reference or Citation entries.

References (3 in Portal)
Back in Time
 
Executive coaching

G Blackman-Sheppard Industrial and Commercial Training 2004

Executive coaching is often seen as higher grade coaching that is the sole prerogative of the high‐flying executive, accompanied on hallowed ground by the mystical executive coach. However, the foundation stones for executive coaching – quality integrated thinking, confidentiality, trust – are equally important to all its people if an org...

Cites in Google Scholar: 421
 
Hidden in plain sight: The active ingredients of executive coaching.

D McKenna, SL Davis Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Sc... 2009

We propose that I/O psychologists who coach executives have overlooked psychotherapy outcome research as a source of information and ideas that can be used to improve our executive coaching practices. This research, based on thousands of studies and many meta-analyses, has converged on the conclusion that four ‘‘active ingredients’’ accou...

Cites in Google Scholar: 225
Citations (36 in Portal)
Forward in Time
 
Life's thumbprint: The impact of significant life events on coaches and their coaching.

F Campone, D Awal Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and P... 2012

Coaches do not come to practice as a blank slate. However, there is little documentation of the impact diverse life experiences have on coaches’ skills, professional evolution or presence in practice. Analysis of a critical events question included in a long-term global study of coach development identified three different clusters of lif...

Cites in Google Scholar: 22
 
Executive coaching outcome research: The contribution of common factors such as relationship, personality match, and self efficacy.

de Haan. E., A Duckworth, D Birch, C Jones Consulting Psychology Journal 2013

This article argues for a new way of studying executive-coaching outcomes, which is illustrated with a study based on data from 156 client– coach pairs. The argument accepts that we are unlikely to get robust data on coaching outcomes in the near future but assumes that we can expect similar effectiveness for coaching as that demonstrated...

Cites in Google Scholar: 354
 
Take care what you bring with you: How coaches' mood and interpersonal behavior affect coaching success.

P Ianiro, S Kauffeld Consulting Psychology Journal 2014

The quality of coaching working alliances is crucial for coaching success. Determining the ingredients that contribute to a high-quality coaching working alliance is an important question for research. Interpersonal behavior is considered to be a vital factor for a successful coach– client working alliance. This study analyzes how a coach...

Cites in Google Scholar: 52
 
The effectiveness of strength-based executive coaching in enhancing full range leadership development: A controlled study.

D MacKie Consulting Psychology Journal 2014

This study attempts to investigate the effectiveness of a strength-based coaching methodology in enhancing elements of the full range leadership model, especially transformational leadership. Transformational leadership is the process whereby leaders engage and influence their followers toward attaining a shared vision through their capac...

Cites in Google Scholar: 205
 
Attitudes of coaches towards the use of computer-based technology in coaching.

S Otte, A Bangerter, M Britsch, U Wüthrich Consulting Psychology Journal 2014

Coaching has become a widespread development practice. From executives to private individuals, people seek for help from professional coaches to achieve their goals. Computer technology might make coaching practice more efficient and more accessible. Parts of the coaching process could be automated and face-to-face sessions replaced by We...

Cites in Google Scholar: 25
 
What clients want: Coaching in organizational context.

D Riddle, N Pothier Jossey-Bass 2011

As the coaching field matures, the need for organizing schemas that permit knowledge sharing becomes more important. This chapter presents the model of what clients want based on the characteristics of their organizations. The model helps readers make predictions about client requests and design solutions that address client needs in the ...

Cites in Google Scholar: 13
 
Investigating the role of the active ingredients in executive coaching.

I Smith, B Brummel Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and P... 2013

Several factors termed the active ingredients have been shown to play a major role in the success of psychotherapy. These ingredients have been theoretically extended to executive coaching, but the impact of these ingredients on coaching success has not yet been tested. This study examined the effects of three active ingredients on compet...

Cites in Google Scholar: 58
 
Strengths-based leadership development: Insights from expert coaches.

D Welch, K Grossaint, K Reid, C Walker Consulting Psychology Journal 2014

There is a growing trend in which coaches are using a strengths-based approach to help leaders move from fair leadership performance toward greater capacities. Although a number of strengths assessments are popular now, there is not enough research on how strengths mature in a long-term, sustainable way. In this article a multiple case st...

Cites in Google Scholar: 77
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From competencies to capabilities in the assessment and accreditation of coaches

T Bachkirova, C Smith International Journal of Evidence Based Coaching and Mentori... 2015

Organisations that use coaching programmes express their need for the assessment of coaches to ensure quality of provision. One solution to this need has been provided by professional bodies that assess coaches as part of their accreditation systems, often using competency frameworks. In this conceptual paper we open four specific deba...

Cites in Google Scholar: 9
 
Coaching in the wild: Identifying factors that lead to success.

S Sonesh, C Coultas, S Marlow, C Lacerenza, D Reyes, E Salas Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2015

Although executive coaching has been shown to be effective, few research initiatives have attempted to understand the importance of the emergent relationship between a coach and coachee. This article explores the factors that influence coaching outcomes from both the coach and coachee’s perspective and presents the results of the mediatin...

Cites in Google Scholar: 3
 
Language use in consultation: Can “we” help teachers and students?

D Newman, M Guiney, CA Barrett Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2015

Analyzing the use of function words such as pronouns in conversation is an increasingly popular approach in social psychology, but has not yet been applied to the study of school-based consultation. The 2 central purposes of this study were to: (a) examine how language is used by consultants-in-training (CITs) and consultees within a coll...

Cites in Google Scholar: 4
 
Identity construction in coaching: Schemas, information processing, and goal commitment

C Coultas, E Salas Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2015

Leadership coaching is a nearly $2 billion per year industry (International Coach Federation, 2012), and although many different theories and approaches to coaching exist, relatively little is known about the differential effectiveness of various coaching approaches. Grounded in theories germane to but that transcend coaching (e.g., socia...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
 
What can Sydney tell us about coaching? Research with implications for practice from down under

A Grant Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2016

This paper details material from 2 presentations given at the 2015 Society of Consulting Psychology Mid-Winter Conference in San Diego, California, which presented a summary of the coaching research conducted at the Coaching Psychology Unit (CPU) at the University of Sydney. The CPU was established in 1999 with a mission to enhance the pe...

Cites in Google Scholar: 2
 
A practice analysis of coaching psychology: Toward a foundational competency model

V Vandaveer, R Lowman, K Pearlman, J Brannick Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2016

This article presents results of an initial, empirically based professional-practice analysis (i.e., “job analysis”) of executive/professional development coaching by psychologists. This project was initiated in 2012 by the Society of Consulting Psychology (SCP) and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) in a coll...

Cites in Google Scholar: 4
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A new model of sustainable change in executive coaching: coachees’ attitudes, required resources and routinisation

N Koroleva International Journal of Evidence Based Coaching and Mentori... 2016

The existing literature lacks theoretical and empirical research when exploring the phenomenon of sustainable change as a result of executive coaching. Despite the rapid growth of executive coaching, there is a disconnection between practice and academic research in assessing sustainable change. This means that reflective practitioners fa...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
 
Executive coaching: The age factor

L Tamir, L Finfer Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2016

Lifespan psychology suggests that executives in their 30s, 40s, and 50s represent different maturational levels and professional experience. To date, research has not explored the relationship between the age of an executive and the coaching process or coaching outcomes. We hypothesized that executives in these age ranges would respond di...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
 
Where we have been, where we are now, and where we might be heading: Where next for the coaching relationship?

A O’Broin Coaching Psykologi 2016

The advent of the current stage of coaching research seeking to identify how coaching works, or the ‘active ingredients’ of coaching has taken coaching relationship research into a more prominent position. In exploring the questions of what we know about the coaching relationship and its role in coaching and coaching outcomes, and how we ...

Cites in Google Scholar: 2
 
The client as active ingredient: ‘Core self-evaluations’ as predictors of coaching outcome variance

D Tee, D Shearer, G Roderique-Davies International Coaching Psychology Review 2017

This pilot study builds on previous research applying the ‘active ingredients’ model to coaching psychology and seeking to identify client traits that may predict coaching efficacy. It examines the relationship between the four ‘core self-evaluation’ traits (self-esteem, generalised self-efficacy, locus of control and neuroticism) and the...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
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Presence in Executive Coaching Conversations – The C2 Model

R Noon International Journal of Evidence Based Coaching and Mentori... 2018

Presence is considered by the practitioner community to be a key factor in coaching effectiveness and is recognised as an important coaching competence. Yet to date, there has been little formal research into this phenomenon in executive coaching. By adopting a constructivist stance, this qualitative study uses the methodology of conceptu...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
 
Students’ perceptions of an executive coaching intervention: a case study of an enabling education programme

R Fields Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and P... 2018

The purpose of this study is to examine the perceived impact of executive coaching upon students in an enabling education programme at CQUniversity, Queensland. While there are shared philosophical underpinnings for enabling education and executive coaching, there are also clear distinctions between the two, which have ramifications for t...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
 
The Efficacy Of Executive Coaching: An Empirical Investigation Of Two Approaches Using Random Assignment And A Switching-Replications Design

J Williams, R Lowman Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2018

Using random assignment and a switching-replications design in a corporate setting, this study compared the effectiveness of two approaches to executive coaching: goal-focused and process-oriented. Goal-focused coaching is based on goal-setting theory, which concentrates on identifying a task to be accomplished, whereas process-oriented c...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
 
Client Dropout From Business Coaching

C Schermuly Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 2018

Research on client dropout in business coaching is scarce even though dropouts can have consequences for clients, coaches, organizations, and the validity of coaching research. In this article, a conceptualization and definition of client dropout are developed and justified. Client dropout is defined as the early termination of coaching b...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
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Reflective practice for coaches and clients: An integrated model for learning

A Hullinger, J DiGirolamo, J Tkach Philosophy of Coaching: An International Journal 2019

The literature on reflection, awareness, and self-regulation provides theoretical and empirical fruit for understanding self-processing mechanisms that enhance learning, growth, and performance. A literature review was conducted to explore the potential of reflection, awareness, and self-regulation as developmental tools for coaches. Fro...

Cites in Google Scholar: 0
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